London's Triumph: Merchants, Adventurers, and Money in Shakespeare's City

London s Triumph Merchants Adventurers and Money in Shakespeare s City The dramatic story of the dazzling growth of London in the sixteenth century For most England in the sixteenth century was the era of the Tudors from Henry VII and VIII to Elizabeth I But as their d

  • Title: London's Triumph: Merchants, Adventurers, and Money in Shakespeare's City
  • Author: Stephen Alford
  • ISBN: 9781620408216
  • Page: 369
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The dramatic story of the dazzling growth of London in the sixteenth century.For most, England in the sixteenth century was the era of the Tudors, from Henry VII and VIII to Elizabeth I But as their dramas played out at court, England was being transformed economically by the astonishing discoveries of the New World and of direct sea routes to Asia At the start of the ceThe dramatic story of the dazzling growth of London in the sixteenth century.For most, England in the sixteenth century was the era of the Tudors, from Henry VII and VIII to Elizabeth I But as their dramas played out at court, England was being transformed economically by the astonishing discoveries of the New World and of direct sea routes to Asia At the start of the century, England was hardly involved in the wider world and London remained a gloomy, introverted medieval city But as the century progressed something extraordinary happened, which placed London at the center of the world stage forever.Stephen Alford s evocative, original new book uses the same skills that made his widely praised The Watchers so successful, bringing to life the network of merchants, visionaries, crooks, and sailors who changed London and England forever In an explosion of energy, English ships were suddenly found all over the world trading with Russia and the Levant, exploring Virginia and the Arctic, and fanning out across the Indian Ocean The people who made this possible the families, the guild members, the money men who were willing to risk huge sums and sometimes their own lives in pursuit of the rare, exotic, and desirable are as interesting as any of those at court Their ambitions fueled a new view of the world initiating a long era of trade and empire, the consequences of which still resonate today.

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      Published :2019-03-27T18:30:45+00:00

    About " Stephen Alford "

  • Stephen Alford

    Stephen Alford FRHistS born 1970 is a British historian and academic He has been professor of early modern British history at the University of Leeds since 2012 Educated at the University of St Andrews, he was formerly a British Academy Post doctoral Research Fellow at the University of Cambridge 1997 99 and junior research fellow of Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge and, between 1999 and 2012, a fellow in history at King s College, Cambridge He has been a fellow of the Royal Historical Society since 2000.

  • 826 Comments

  • This was well written and a quick, entertaining read! It's not dense like some nonfiction texts, which was refreshing. It's something anyone with a casual interest in nonfiction could breeze through and enjoy. I learned a few things I didn't know and enjoyed seeing the actions of influential players like Italy, Spain, and France from a slightly different perspective. Thank you to the publisher for sending me a finished copy.


  • I learned very little about London from this book. Alford used London just as a stepping stone to other things, particularly voyages of discovery and trade. In truth, I'm not sure why he had to title the book what he did.


  • A good book for someone who wants a snapshot of London over a period between 1500-1620 and featuring some better and lesser known merchant adventurers. Not so good on actual trade. Primary sources, for example, are a number of wills and theatre plays rather than trading accounts. Alford stresses the importance of the founding of Muscovy Company for example and the monopoly on trade with Russia it was granted but then doesn't really say very much about it - how much was this trade worth? Did it i [...]


  • I received London's Triumph as part of a giveaway.London's Triumph explores London's (and England's) enormous growth, both in population and prestige, during Shakespeare's time (broadly, the 16th century and the early decades of the 17th). In particular, it looks at the lives of merchants and those who sought to grow England's economy both domestically and abroad, giving an intimate glance into characters who were neither nobility nor peasant, and whose innovations drove England's rise as a maj [...]


  • Notwithstanding that my library's copy of the book was printed upside down and backwards with respect to the cover and the subtitle is different, perhaps as a newer edition: Merchants, Adventurers and Money in Shakespeare's City -- this is really a first-rate, very approachable short history. What makes it stand out is the author brings us a well-rounded look at 16th century London through the lives of these mercantilists, ocean-going and overland explorers and early financiers rather than ruler [...]


  • This book delves into the history of Elizabethan London by looking at how merchants and their money and trade expeditions shaped the city. It's a very interesting and, I believe, incredibly important perspective. The author used plenty of great sources, including plays, poems, travel journals, church records, art, and many others. I appreciate that because it provides a wide scope. Perhaps the best aspect about this book is that it looks at the city in a broad sense and then on a small scale by [...]





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